On the Naming of Things

Normally I’d reveal this kind of news with some extravagant gala event, and a big spinning podium with a curtain drawn all the way around it and booth babes and whatnot. But I loaned my spinning podium to a friend and he hasn’t brought it back yet. And my lady, yyyyeah, she’s not too keen on the booth babes thing.
But anyway, those of you who’ve been following me for a little while will know that I’ve been wrestling with the notion of a series title for, oh, around about eight frackin’ months now. I know it seems to be the norm to just name your series after the first book nowadays, but where’s the masochism in that?
I totally understand why so many people do it – because coming up with titles is hard. Series titles are even worse, because if you screw it up, you’re stuck with it for three, four, twelve books. I mean, just imagine if George R.R Martin had called ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ something like ‘Every Single Character You’re Remotely Fond of is Going To Die’. Would it be selling squintillions around the globe? Maybe not. Although Pete Dinklage might have remembered to thank him in his Emmy acceptance speech at least. (Oooooh, wicked burn)
Titles have gravitas. A series title is supposed to say something about every book within it – to sum up tomes that the author in all likelihood hasn’t even written yet. To spell out the meta-plot of your X00,000 word opus in barely a handful. Plus, your editors need to like it too, and they do this word thing for a living and can sometimes be hard to please.
But, we got there. Without further ado, rotating podiums or scantily clad wenches, and because the first thing you probably did after you read the post title was to scroll down to the bright shiny pic at the end anyway, I give you:


25 Responses to β€œOn the Naming of Things”

  1. CobraMisfit says:

    Oooooo. Very enticing.
    *waits at bookstore for series to appear on the shelves*

  2. Fran says:

    Wow, I think that works really well – it’s big and tough, it implies something ongoing with far reaching effects and consequences. It’s also pretty and imbued with a sense of the far East.
    We had a tough time coming up with ours, but David hit upon it in the end. Religions crop up quite a bit in our stories, as does war (ha, jolly). So the idea of extinct religions was what we wanted to convey.

  3. I love that series title so hard. Also, love the graphic reveal. πŸ˜€ Tell that friend of yours he’s no friend for holding that spinning podium hostage.

    • Yeah, he’s a bastard. I’ma punch him in the neck next time I see him.
      Graphic isn’t official, btw. It was just something I knocked together on Photoshop, coz yeah, I’m nerdy like that πŸ˜›

  4. kevinhearne says:

    I dig this. πŸ™‚ Congrats, sir!

  5. I love The Lotus War. It sounds epic, and scary and yet strangely serene. Also sounds good when you say, “The Lotus War movies, you know those Hollywood blockbusters”.

  6. zoraida says:

    Fancy πŸ˜‰

  7. Manon Eileen says:

    I love it, Jay, well done πŸ˜€ and the announcement too. You always make me smile!

  8. Judd says:

    For the record, when I read it (and I waited… no pre-scrolling) I totally saw spinning buxom wenches handing my beers so big they hurt to lift a little. So many wins.

  9. Clara says:

    There’s two words that best describe this.
    Kick.Ass.

  10. Ad. says:

    Since you asked the question I’ll answer it. There was a question. I saw the punctuation!
    Storm Dancer is evocative. It brings so much to the table. Storm implies so much. Says so much. No matter who we are we can identify with a storm. Be it a thunderous roaring full of wind, hardship and lightning or simply a drenching repetitive rain driving onto a tin roof.
    Then Dancer, dancers to can be so many things. Soft supple and expressive or a raging heaving body in ecstasy or pain.
    Both words used in your title offer options, mystery they draw me in to an unknown that I want answers to.
    The Lotus Wars, I don’t know. I kind of know you. I know you hate to leave things unfinished. But it just feels like you settled here due to constraints. Be they time or frustration with difficulty of hitting the proverbial nail. But I feel it’s a dead end. I’m not drawn to explore. You’ve taken away my ability to ‘read’ and instead ‘told’ me. It sounds like a Robert Ludlum title. That’s not necessarily a bad thing though based on sales there.
    But hey it’s just an opinion of one more intraweb crawling know-it-all wannabe. Bin me, ban me or berate me. I can take it. πŸ™‚
    Still love you and I know your work will be as much of you as you can get out and very proud of that.
    Shooting off for last exam for the year.
    wave
    A.
    p.s. If you want to kill this post and not publish it that’s cool. Just felt the need to comment.

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